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Environmental News


Environmental News from the Great Lakes Region

Thursday, December 11, 2014
Move Over Lithium-Ion: Vanadium-Flow Batteries Gain Commercial Traction
Having closed its first sales contracts here in the U.S., Imergy Power Systems' vanadium-flow battery systems offer distinct advantages as compared to their Li-ion counterparts, company President Tim Hennessy told 3p. For those unfamiliar with vanadium, it is a soft element, found in about 65 different minerals, that naturally resists corrosion. Longer discharge duration and greater scalability are other key differentiating factors of vanadium-flow batteries, Hennessy continued, making Imergy's ESP30s better suited for grid-scale applications. Furthermore, the electrolytes used never need to be replaced, they're nontoxic and non-flammable. Source: Triple Pundit, 12/11/14

Plugging the leaks: how digital tools can prevent water loss
Water companies are using artificial intelligence to tackle the loss of one-fifth of treated water before it reaches your tap. Source: The Guardian, 12/11/14

The hidden environmental cost of the Internet of Things
As M2M technologies continue revolutionize industries, there are concerns about the toll that the connected objects that comprise the IoT will exact on the environment. Source: ComputerWorld Australia, 12/8/14

New NYC law will ban e-waste with regular trash
Starting New Year's Day, it will be illegal to include electronics with normal trash and recycling, and those who do will face a $100 fine for each violation. Source: Capital New York, 12/9/14

Turning E-Waste into Light
Bangalore-based IBM Research India has a bright idea for keeping discarded lithium laptop batteries out of landfills: repurposing their cells as energy supplies for the powerless. The idea, presented at this weekend's fifth annual Symposium on Computing for Development (DEV 2014) in San Jose, has passed a small proof-of-principle test run with Bangalore's working poor. Source: IEEE Spectrum, 12/8/14

Our E-Waste Problem Is Ridiculous, and Gadget Makers Aren't Helping
Chances are high that you'll be getting or giving new electronics this holiday season: an iPhone upgrade for mom perhaps, or maybe a new Windows 8 ultrabook. Device upgrades have become increasingly frequent for many of us. Unfortunately, too many people give virtually no thought to what becomes of all these discarded gadgets. And neither are most device manufacturers. Source: Wired, 12/8/14

EPA Announces New Energy Star Tool for Homeowners to Save Money, Energy This Winter
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has launched its Energy Star Home Advisor, an online tool designed to help Americans save money and energy by improving the energy efficiency of their homes through recommended, customized and prioritized home-improvement projects. The updated Energy Star Home Advisor guides the homeowner through a "do-it-yourself" energy assessment to create an Energy Star home profile. Based on the newly created profile, the Home Advisor provides customized, prioritized recommendations for improvements. From these recommendations, users can create their own to-do lists of projects such as adding insulation to the attic or replacing an HVAC air filter. Source: US EPA, 12/8/14

Wednesday, December 10, 2014
Discarded Laptop Batteries Keep the Lights On
Many of the estimated 50 million lithium-ion laptop batteries discarded every year could provide electricity storage sufficient to light homes in poor countries, researchers at IBM say. In work being aired this week at a conference in San Jose, researchers at IBM Research India in Bangalore found that at least 70 percent of all discarded batteries have enough life left to power an LED light at least four hours a day for a year. The IBM group, working with a hardware R&D firm called RadioStudio, tore open discarded laptop battery packaging and extracted individual storage units called cells, tested those individually to pick out the good ones, and recombined them to form refurbished battery packs. Then, after adding charging dongles as well as circuitry to prevent overheating, they gave them to five users in Bangalore who lived in slums or operated sidewalk carts. Source: MIT Technology Review, 12/3/14

Tuesday, December 9, 2014
Call2Recycle Hits 100m lbs of Batteries Recycled & Secures R2:2013
Call2Recycle, North America's first and largest consumer battery stewardship program, has marked its 20th anniversary of diverting used batteries and cell phones from landfill by hitting the 100 million pound (45,359 tonne) milestone for batteries recycled since 1994. The organisation explained that it collects and recycles consumer batteries and cell phones at no cost throughout the U.S. and Canada and ensures that the items, which contain valuable resources, are responsibly recycled to create new batteries and other products, keeping potentially hazardous materials from entering the waste stream. Source: Waste Management World, 12/8/14

EPA Announces New Energy Star Tool for Homeowners to Save Money, Energy This Winter
Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is launching its Energy Star Home Advisor, an online tool designed to help Americans save money and energy by improving the energy efficiency of their homes through recommended, customized and prioritized home-improvement projects. Source: U.S. EPA, 12/8/14

Green tape: Do environmental regulations harm the economy?
Recent policy proposals have reinvigorated familiar claims that environmental rules stifle business. But where's the evidence? Source: GreenBiz, 12/8/14

Upstart manufacturer turns fiber waste into building materials
Noble Environmental Technologies is mainstreaming its ECOR technology, with the help of ex-IKEA execs and an institutional investor. Source: GreenBiz, 12/9/14

Our E-Waste Problem Is Ridiculous, and Gadget Makers Aren't Helping
Chances are high that you'll be getting or giving new electronics this holiday season: an iPhone upgrade for mom perhaps, or maybe a new Windows 8 ultrabook. Device upgrades have become increasingly frequent for many of us. Unfortunately, too many people give virtually no thought to what becomes of all these discarded gadgets. And neither are most device manufacturers. Some 41.5 million tons of electronic waste was generated in 2011, and that number is expected to rise to 93.5 million by 2016, according to the research firm MarketsandMarkets. Right now, 70 to 80 percent of all that old gadgetry goes straight to landfills. Source: Wired, 12/8/14

Monday, December 8, 2014
Chemical Footprint Project: The next step in reporting
This is the first common metric for publicly benchmarking companies' use of chemicals. Here's how it works. Source: GreenBiz, 12/8/14

New Tool Launched Today Measures Corporate Progress Towards Safer Chemicals
A group of corporate and NGO leaders today released a new tool for assessing leadership in corporate chemicals management. The Chemical Footprint Project (CFP) provides the first-ever common metric of its kind for publicly benchmarking corporate chemicals management and profiling leadership companies. Similar to Carbon Footprinting, Chemical Footprinting can apply to any business sector. Retailers, health care organizations, governments, and investors all see value in a comprehensive measure of business progress to safer chemicals. Source: Clean Production Action via CSRWire, 12/8/14

Friday, December 5, 2014
Sustainability reporting is stalled -- here's how to add value
The thousands of hours that companies spend on sustainability reporting could be re-engineered to drive financial and social outcomes. Source: GreenBiz, 12/5/14

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