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Sustainable School Design : Browse by Keyword
Table of Contents
Background and Overview
Operations
P2 Opportunities
Alternative Technologies
Case Studies
Glossary of Terms
Curricula
Key Contacts
Acknowledgements
Complete List of Links

Keywords:
Air conditioning / Air pollution / Air pollution control / Air quality / Air quality control / Air quality management / Alternative fuels / Alternative technologies / Architecture / Asbestos / Assessment / Associations, institutions, etc. / Attitudes / Auditing / Awards / Best management practices / Biogas / Biomass / Biomass energy / Budget / Budget deficits / Building / Building maintenance / Building materials / California / Carpets / Case studies / Chemical laboratories / Chemical storage / Chemical tracking / Chemicals / Chemistry / Citizen participation / Cleaning / Community development / Conservation of natural resources / Construction and demolition debris / Construction contracts / Construction industry / Consumer behavior / Consumer education / Consumers / Curricula / Demolition / Dishwashing / Disinfection and disinfectants / Economic analysis / Economic aspects / Economic assistance / Economic impact / Economic incentives / Education / Educational institutions / Efficiency / Electric power / Electricity / Emission control / Emissions / Employee safety / Employees / Energy auditing / Energy conservation / Energy consumption / Energy policy / Environment / Environmental aspects / Environmental auditing / Environmental exposure / Environmental health / Environmental management / Environmental monitoring / Environmental policy / Environmental protection / Environmental technology / Environmentally safe products / Facility management / Fluorescent lighting / Food waste / Fossil fuels / Fuel / Fume hoods / Furnaces / Furniture / Gardening / Geothermal resources / Government agencies / Gray water / Green marketing / Greenhouse gases / Handbooks, manuals, etc. / Hazardous substances / Hazardous waste / Hazardous waste disposal / Hazardous waste management / Health / Health effects / Heating / Illinois / Incentives / Indoor air pollution / Indoor air quality / Information / Insecticides / Kilns / Laboratories / Laboratory wastes / Land use / Landscaping industry / Latex paint / Laws and legislation / Life cycle assessment / Lighting / Lumber / Maintenance / Management / Material safety data sheets / Materials handling / Mercury / Minnesota / Mulching / Needs assessment / New York (N.Y.) / Noise / Noise control / Occupational safety and health / Office equipment and supplies / Organizational behavior / Paint / Paint removers / Paper / Paper waste / Pest control / Pesticide residues / Pesticides / Pollution prevention / Public utilities / Purchasing / Recycled products / Recycling (Waste, etc.) / Reduction / Refrigerators / Right-to-know / Risk factors / Risk management / Rodenticides / Runoff / Rural development / Safety equipment / Safety measures / Scientific apparatus and instruments / Site assessment / Siting / Social responsibility / Solar energy / Solid waste / Solvent waste / Source reduction (Waste management) / Spills and accidents / Standards / State governments / States / Stormwater / Substitute materials / Sustainable development / Technical assistance / Technology / Thermometers / Toxicity / Transportation / United States / United States. Environmental Protection Agency / Waste / Waste disposal / Waste management / Waste paper / Waste products / Waste reduction / Waste storage / Water / Water conservation / Water pollution / Wind power / Windows / Wisconsin / Zero discharge


Alphabetical Listing of Reference Documents by Title
NOTE: [PDF] links require Acrobat Reader from Adobe.

Alliance to Save Energy: Saving Energy in Schools
Abstract: This portion of the Alliance to Save Energy web site includes best practices for controlling energy costs for school operations and maintenance; school energy efficiency links; energy efficient school construction resources; indoor air quality information; information on school retrofits; and pollution calculators that allow for the estimation of the environmental benefits of an energy efficiency measure.
Source: Alliance to Save Energy
URL: http://www.ase.org/section/topic/schoolenergy/

Green Schools Checklist: Environmental Actions for Schools to Consider [PDF]
Abstract: This checklist offers tips and resources to help schools identify opportunities to "green" their buildings and operations, ranging from the solid waste they generate, to the indoor environment they provide, to the energy and supplies they consume. Emphasis has been placed on prevention-oriented strategies, which are preferable to dealings with wastes and pollutants after the fact. The benefits of a green school program are outlined and management strategies are included. Sections include: energy use, indoor air quality, solid waste, hazardous materials, mercury use, laboratory waste, mold growth, water consumption, building construction/renovation, purchasing, pest management, groundskeeping, and food service. (PDF Format; Length: 24 pages)
Source: IL Environmental Protection Agency
URL: http://www.epa.state.il.us/green-illinois/green-schools/gree
n-schools-checklist.pdf

Green Schools Project: Using Energy Efficiency to Strengthen Schools
Abstract: The Green Schools program helps schools use energy efficiently through building retrofits, changes in operational and maintenance routines, and changes in the behavior of building users. Students, teachers, custodians, administrators, and community partners all work together toward a common goal--saving energy and money. This web site includes information on how to start an energy efficiency program at your school, news, lesson plans, resources, an online forum for teachers, information for students, case studies, and information on sustainable school construction.
Source: Alliance to Save Energy
URL: http://www.ase.org/section/program/greenschl/

Green Schools Recycling and More
Abstract: The focus of this webpage is a comprehensive solid waste management program; however, here are areas to consider that will help further your transformation to a Green School.
Source: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
URL: http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/8803.html

Green Schools: Attributes for Health and Learning
Abstract: Evidence has accumulated that shows that the quality of indoor environments can affect the health and productivity of adults and children. One consequence is that a movement has emerged to promote the design of schools that have fewer adverse environmental effects. To examine the potential of such design for improving education, several private organizations asked the National Research Council (NRC) to review and assess the health and productivity benefits of green schools. This report provides an analysis of the complexity of making such a determination; and an assessment of the potential human health and performance benefits of improvements in the building envelope, indoor air quality, lighting, and acoustical quality. The report also presents an assessment of the overall building condition and student achievement, and offers an analysis of and recommendations for planning and maintaining green schools including research considerations. (PDF Format; Length: 192 pages)
Source: National Academies Press, NRC
URL: http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=11756#description

Green Seal Green Facilities Partnership [PDF]
Abstract: The aims of the Partnership are to provide recognition and, if requested, technical assistance to organizations that are working to implement environmentally preferable operations and maintenance practices. The Green Facilities Partnership is not a standard-based certification program; rather, the partnership provides recognition based on implementation of an action plan that is specific to each partner organizations particular challenges and opportunities. The Green Facilities Partnership is intended to complement established green building certification programs, in particular the US Green Building Council's LEED rating systems. In order to achieve the highest level of the partnership--Green Facilities Champion--organization will be expected to make all reasonable efforts to achieve LEED certification for its operations and maintenance program.
Source: Green Seal
URL: http://www.greenseal.org/programs/Green_Facilities_Partnersh
ip.pdf

Healthy School Environments Assessment Tool (HealthySEAT)
Abstract: EPA has developed a unique software tool to help school districts evaluate and manage their school facilities for key environmental, safety and health issues. [Note: EPA is using the term "district" to broadly describe any institutional system for managing multiple schools, whether they are public, private, tribal, charter or some variation.] The Healthy School Environments Assessment Tool (HealthySEATv2) is designed to be customized and used by district-level staff to conduct completely voluntary self-assessments of their school (and other) facilities and to track and manage information on environmental conditions school by school. In addition to powerful software that can be used by districts to track any facility issues it chooses, EPA has also included critical elements of all of its regulatory and voluntary programs for schools, as well as web links to more detailed information. Districts and others can download HealthySEATv2 at no cost from the EPA web site. HealthySEATv2 is meant to be loaded and used on district computers; once it is downloaded from the EPA web site, HealthySEATv2 is yours to customize and use as you see fit. There are no reporting requirements and no obligation to use the checklist EPA has provided.
Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/schools/healthyseat/index.html

Healthy Schools: Lessons for a Clean Educational Environment [PDF]
Abstract: More than 53 million children and 6 million adults in the United States spend their days in our elementary and secondary schools. Reducing environmental risks inside these buildings is critical to maintaining the public health. Almost all of New England's children will spend a large portion of their childhood in school. To help our children stay healthy, we must reduce their exposure to environmental hazards in school environments. When students and their teachers are healthy and comfortable, children learn and produce more in the classroom, which in turn improves performance and achievement later in life. This brochure can help school employees and parents recognize potential environmental health issues at schools, both indoors and outdoors. It includes basic information about a broad range of topics, and links to web sites that offer more information and guidance on how to have a healthier school environment and comply with relevant laws. EPA's Healthy School Environments web site provides access to programs that help prevent and resolve environmental issues in schools.
Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
URL: http://www.epa.gov/NE/children/pdfs/healthy_schools.pdf

High Performance School Q & A [PDF]
Abstract: High level answers to common questions regarding high performance schools. (PDF Format; Length: 2 pages)
Source: BetterBricks
URL: http://www.betterbricks.com/graphics/assets/documents/QandA_
Final.pdf

High Performance Schools
Abstract: US EPA's Indoor Air Quality Design Tools for Schools defines High Performance Schools, explains the benefits and characteristics of high performance schools as well as financing these schools. The tools address design phases, controlling pollutants and sources as well as construction, commissioning, renovation and much more.
Source: US EPA's IAQ Design Tools for Schools
URL: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/schooldesign/highperformance.html

High-Performance School Buildings Resource and Strategy Guide: Beyond Green
Abstract: This nationally vetted and easy-to-read guidebook describes the characteristics and benefits of high-performance school buildings and details the process to help school planners ask the right questions of their design professionals to ensure the best school design possible. Written primarily for those who make decisions about the design and construction of K-12 schools, the 96-page Guide is useful for community leaders, parents, teachers, architects and engineers, and anyone else advocating for school buildings that are cost-effective, sustainable, and healthy and productive for students, teachers, and staff. The third edition includes an introductory foreword; a special focus about accessibility in K-12 schools; a Beyond Green case study of Radnor Middle School, Wayne, Pa.; and seven key project objectives—cost effectiveness, accessibility, productivity and health, historic preservation, safety and security, functionality and aesthetics. Publisher: Sustainable Buildings Industry Council, Washington, D.C. Author: Deanne Evans, FAIA. Price: $55 (U.S.).
Source: Sustainable Buildings Industry Council
URL: http://www.sbicouncil.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlen
br=115

Illinois Sustainable Education Project (ISTEP)
Abstract: The Illinois Sustainable Education Project (ISTEP) provides education about energy efficiency, renewable energy, and the process of recycling to increase the awareness of:the link between economic development and environmental protection; the environmental and economic consequences of our actions and values; and how informed decisions can move Illinois toward a more sustainable future.
Source: Illinois Department of Commerce
URL: http://www.commerce.state.il.us/dceo/Bureaus/Energy_Recyclin
g/Education/ISTEP_program.htm

Illinois Sustainable Schools Compact [PDF]
Abstract: The Illinois Sustainable Schools Compact program launched on January 31, 2008 features best practices that K-12 schools can voluntarily pursue to achieve greater environmental sustainability. Schools as well as districts can check off up to 12 practices to participate, including things on the list the school or district is already doing. Those who wish to participate should print two copies of the compact, have the principal sign the documents after checking off practices the school is now pursuing and aims to pursue, then mail both copies to: Office of the Lieutenant Governor, Attn: Jon Zirkle, Thompson Center, 100 W. Randolph, Suite 15-200, Chicago, IL 60601-3220. Lt. Governor Quinn will sign both copies, keep one on file, then mail one copy back to the school.
Source: Office of the Lt. Governor of Illinois
URL: http://www.standingupforillinois.org/pdf/green/sustainable_s
chool_compact_012908.pdf

Integrated Design Process for Schools [PDF]
Abstract: Overall guidance, checklist, and key terms for using the integrated design process to achieve a high performance school. (PDF Format; Length: 4 pages)
Source: Betterbricks
URL: http://www.betterbricks.com/graphics/assets/documents/Integr
atedDesignProcess-Resource_Final.pdf

LEED for Schools
Abstract: The LEED for Schools Rating System recognizes the unique nature of the design and construction of K-12 schools. Based on LEED for New Construction, it addresses issues such as classroom acoustics, master planning, mold prevention, and environmental site assessment. By addressing the uniqueness of school spaces and children's health issues, LEED for Schools provides a unique, comprehensive tool for schools that wish to build green, with measurable results. LEED for Schools is the recognized third-party standard for high performance schools that are healthy for students, comfortable for teachers, and cost-effective.
Source: US Green Building Council
URL: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=1586

Lessons in Efficiency
Abstract: Anyone who is in contact with children—be they a teacher or a parent—knows one of the most successful ways to create social change is to start with the youth. Of the many efforts conducted throughout the US to create "greener" schools, water efficiency is one of the pivotal factors. Three of the 10 largest school districts are in Florida, which has been under water conservation measures for months. The fifth-largest school district is in Clark County, NV, another focus of water use concerns. Throughout the US, many governmental water agencies are partnering with local school districts in identifying and addressing water waste issues. Article by Carol Brzozowksi, Water Efficiency, March 2008.
Source: Water Efficiency
URL: http://www.waterefficiency.net/march-2008/lessons-efficiency
-schools.aspx

National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities (NCEF)
Abstract: Created in 1997 by the U.S. Department of Education, the National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities (NCEF) provides information on planning, designing, funding, building, improving, and maintaining safe, healthy, high performance schools. The NCEF site provides extensive resource lists on various topics, which are grouped into the following broad categories: Preplanning, Planning, Design, School Spaces, School Grounds, Case Studies, Safe Schools, Healthy Schools, High Performance Schools, Technology, Materials & Equipment, School Construction, Financing, Building & Operating Costs, and Maintenance & Operations.
Source: National Institute of Building Sciences
URL: http://www.edfacilities.org/

Safe Shops Tool Kit
Abstract: The Boston Public Health Commission's Safe Shops Tool Kit was developed to describe how the Safe Shops Project was created and to provide other communities which are also working toward goals of environmental health and pollution prevention in auto shops the tools and resources necessary to start or compliment initiatives of their own. Tool Kit sections include: Safe Shops Case Study; Develop & Sustain Partnerships; Identifying Shops; Creating an Educational Program; Addressing Health Disparities; Auto Shop Links & Resources; Apply for Funding Resources; and Providing Incentives. The Tool Kit can be downloaded in its entirety in a zip file at the address listed above. You can also view the sections online and download documents associated with each section separately. Please note that other auto shop educational material and information about the Safe Shops Project can be found at http://www.bphc.org/safeshops.
Source: Boston Public Health Commission
URL: http://www.bphc.org/bphc/safeshops_toolkit.asp

Sustainable Buildings Industry Council School Buildings Program
Abstract: The SBIC schools program addresses three key questions: What is a high-performance school building?;Why is it valuable?;and,How can they be achieved in the community? SBIC's program is unique because it speaks directly to the procurement specialists, school board members, superintendents and district officials, and community advocates who seek high-performance schools and because it goes Beyond Green(TM) honing in on critical issues like accessibility, safety and security, durability, and classroom acoustics - perhaps one of the most challenging issues facing educators today. The centerpiece of the program is the third edition of the High-Performance School Buildings Resource & Strategy Guide and the two-day Beyond Green(TM) companion workshop. In addition, the Council has created on-line training for NYSERDA and an Information & Training Center for those seeking to promote these facilities.
Source: Sustainable Buildings Industry Council
URL: http://www.sbicouncil.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlen
br=98

Sustainable Flooring: Successful Community Partnerships Build Sustainable School Buildings
Abstract: Poudre School District in Fort Collins, Colo., embarked on a mission: to work with designers in creating a high-performance school that not only set new standards in education facility design, but also stayed within the restraints of a typical school budget. To achieve this goal, the district chose to pursue Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification for its new Fossil Ridge High School. The result: A state-of-the-art, 290,000-square-foot building with capacity for 1,800 students--all of whom will learn in an environmentally responsible, healthy building that's saving the school district money. Case study written by Lee H. Schilling. Source: Environmental Design + Construction (EDC) Magazine, May 20, 2008; also available in the print June 2008 edition of the magazine.
Source: Environmental Design + Construction (EDC) Magazine
URL: http://www.edcmag.com/CDA/Articles/Sustainable_Flooring/BNP_
GUID_9-5-2006_A_10000000000000341474

U.S. EPA Healthy School Environments Portal
Abstract: The Healthy School Environments Web pages are intended to serve as a gateway to on-line resources to help facility managers, school administrators, architects, design engineers, school nurses, parents, teachers and staff address environmental health issues in schools. Included on these pages are links to information on: the design, construction and renovation of school buildings; energy efficiency for schools; environmental education; facility operations and maintenance; indoor environmental air quality; legislation and regulations related to children's environmental health; outdoor air pollution; portable classrooms; safety and preparedness; waste issues, including recycling, waste reduction and composting; and water issues. The site also provides quick links to relevant U.S. EPA programs. The portal site also provides information about an assessment tool that EPA is developing to help school districts evaluate their school facilities for key environmental, safety and health issues in an effort to promote the health and safety of children and staff in the nation's 120,000+ public and private school facilities.
Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/schools/

U.S. EPA School Chemical Cleanout Campaign (SC3)
Abstract: The Schools Chemical Cleanout Campaign (SC3) aims to ensure that all schools are free from hazards associated with mismanaged chemicals. SC3 gives K-12 schools information and tools to responsibly manage chemicals. By using the tools provided on this site and pulling together a team with a variety of perspectives, expertise, and resources you can develop a successful chemical management program. Schools, parents, and local organizations can partner to create a chemical management program that meets the unique needs of their schools. SC3 is one component of EPA's Resource Conservation Challenge (RCC), a national effort to conserve natural resources and energy by managing materials more efficiently.
Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
URL: http://www.epa.gov/sc3/

Wisconsin Green and Healthy Schools Program
Abstract: Wisconsin Green & Healthy Schools program is a web-based, voluntary program available to all public and private elementary, middle, and high schools across Wisconsin. The program encourages teachers, staff, students and parents to work together to use the school, its grounds, and the whole community as learning tools to help teach, promote, and apply healthy, safe and environmentally sound practices. There is no time limit for completing the program. You can move at your own pace. Educators, administrators, staff and students use Green & Healthy School resources with DNR and DPI support to assist with curriculum integration, community involvement, and implementation.
Source: Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR)
URL: http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/ce/greenschools/index.htm

 


The Topic Hub™ is a product of the Pollution Prevention Resource Exchange (P2Rx)

The Sustainable School Design Topic Hub™ was developed by:

Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable
Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable
Contact email: glrppr@istc.illinois.edu

Hub Last Updated: 8/2/2012

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