GLRPPR: Sector Resources: Documents: Consumer behaviour towards price-reduced suboptimal foods in the supermarket and the relation to food waste in households
 
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GLRPPR Sector Resource: Consumer behaviour towards price-reduced suboptimal foods in the supermarket and the relation to food waste in households

Title:
Consumer behaviour towards price-reduced suboptimal foods in the supermarket and the relation to food waste in households

Abstract:
To combat food waste, supermarkets offer food items at a reduced price in-store when they are close to the expiration date or perceived as suboptimal. It is yet unknown, however, which considerations consumers engage in when deciding about the offer, and whether focusing particularly on the price during food purchase might be related to greater food waste at home. Knowledge about both the consumers' food purchase process for these price-reduced foods and the potential wastage of price-focused consumers can contribute to the assessment of whether or not offering suboptimal food at reduced prices in-store actually reduces food waste across the supply chain. We explore these questions in a mixed-method study including 16 qualitative accompanied shopping interviews and a quantitative online experimental survey with 848 consumers in Denmark. The interviews reveal that the consumers interviewed assess their ability to consume the price-reduced suboptimal food at home already while in the store. Consumers consider the relation between product-related factors of package unit, expiration date, and product quality, in interaction with household-related factors of freezing/storing, household size/demand, and possible meal/cooking. The survey shows that consumers who are more price-focused report lower food waste levels and lower tendency to choose the optimal food item first at home, than those who are not emphasizing the price-quality relation or do not search for price offers to the same extent. Higher age and high education also played a role, and the price-focus is lower in high-income groups and among single households. The findings allow deriving recommendations for retailers and policy makers to support both the marketability and the subsequent actual consumption of price-reduced suboptimal food, but they also raise questions for further research of this underexplored area.

Contact your local library to obtain the full-text of this journal article.

URL:
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2017.05.013

Source:
Appetite 116, 246-258.

Resource Type:
Article/report

Date of Publication:
September 2017

Associated Sectors:

  P2Rx

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