GLRPPR: Sector Resources: Documents: Mercury in Women of Childbearing Age in 25 Countries
 
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GLRPPR Sector Resource: Mercury in Women of Childbearing Age in 25 Countries

Title:
Mercury in Women of Childbearing Age in 25 Countries

Abstract:
Mercury is a potent neurotoxin, especially to the developing brain, and can affect the developing fetus months after the mother's exposure. The harmful effects that can be passed from the mother to the fetus when the mother's mercury levels exceed 1 ppm include neurological impairment, IQ loss, and damage to the kidneys and cardiovascular system. At high levels of mercury exposure this can lead to brain damage, mental retardation, blindness, seizures and the inability to speak. While researchers have studied mercury body burden in specific regions of the world, information in developing and transition countries is lacking. This comprehensive study focused on measuring the mercury body burden of 1044 women of child-bearing age in 25 developing and transition countries. The data indicates that there is a serious and substantial threat to women and children's health from mercury exposure.

URL:
http://ipen.org/sites/default/files/documents/update_18_sept_mercury-women-report-v1_5.pdf

Source:
IPEN

Resource Type:
Article/report

Date of Publication:
September 2017

Associated Sectors:

GLRPPR is a member of the Pollution Prevention Resource Exchange, a national network of regional information centers: NEWMOA (Northeast), WRRC (Southeast), GLRPPR (Great Lakes), ZeroWasteNet (Southwest), P2RIC (Plains), Peaks to Prairies (Mountain), WSPPN (Pacific Southwest), PPRC (Northwest).

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