GLRPPR: Sector Resources: Documents: New York State's Producer Responsibility Law for Electronic Waste: Reflecting on the First Year: Interim Report
 
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GLRPPR Sector Resource: New York State's Producer Responsibility Law for Electronic Waste: Reflecting on the First Year: Interim Report

Title:
New York State's Producer Responsibility Law for Electronic Waste: Reflecting on the First Year: Interim Report

Abstract:
Upon enacting the Electronic Equipment Recycling and Reuse Act in 2010, New York became the 22nd state to require that manufacturers of certain electronics provide collection and recycling services to properly manage their products after consumers no longer need them. New York was able to craft its law based on observations and experiences with earlier enacted programs in other states, and it is considered to be one of the most progressive. April 1, 2012 marks one year since the law's implementation and provides an opportunity to reflect on the transition to this "producer responsibility" system. This anniversary also represents an occasion to examine from varied perspectives the law' s effects on the ease and cost of e-waste recycling. This preliminary analysis is based on interviews with key stakeholders, including local governments, electronics manufacturers, and electronics recyclers. Local governments provide a particularly important first-hand perspective as they have had direct experience with electronics recycling in their communities both prior to and during the law's implementation. Data on the law's impact on the recycling rate for electronics is not yet available. A more comprehensive review of the Act's implementation is planned for the summer of 2012, after more information is released by the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). The final report will also include additional input from key stakeholders including manufacturers, retailers, nonprofit collectors, and other local governments including representatives from major metropolitan areas beyond New York City. Overall, preliminary results from the first year of the program are positive. The law has succeeded in creating a vibrant market for used electronics, leading to an increase in the number of collection sites around the state and cost savings for many local governments. A few notable challenges remain, however, including establishing robust collection infrastructure in New York City and raising the public's awareness of the importance of recycling electronics and how to do so.

URL:
http://www.productstewardship.us/associations/6596/files/Report_NYS_Producer_Responsibility_Law_for_Electronics.pdf

Source:
Product Stewardship Institute

Resource Type:
Article/report

Date of Publication:
2012

Associated Sectors:

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