Great Lakes Regional Pollution Prevention Roundtable
Promoting Pollution Prevention Through Information Exchange
   

GLRPPR Sector Resource: Light Pollution

Title:
Light Pollution

Abstract:
If humans were truly at home under the light of the moon and stars, we would go in darkness happily, the midnight world as visible to us as it is to the vast number of nocturnal species on this planet. Instead, we are diurnal creatures, with eyes adapted to living in the sun's light. This is a basic evolutionary fact, even though most of us don't think of ourselves as diurnal beings any more than we think of ourselves as primates or mammals or Earthlings. Yet it's the only way to explain what we've done to the night: We've engineered it to receive us by filling it with light. This kind of engineering is no different than damming a river. Its benefits come with consequences--called light pollution--whose effects scientists are only now beginning to study. Light pollution is largely the result of bad lighting design, which allows artificial light to shine outward and upward into the sky, where it's not wanted, instead of focusing it downward, where it is. Ill-designed lighting washes out the darkness of night and radically alters the light levels--and light rhythms--to which many forms of life, including ourselves, have adapted. Wherever human light spills into the natural world, some aspect of life--migration, reproduction, feeding--is affected.

URL:
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/11/light-pollution/klinkenborg-text

Source:
National Geographic Magazine

Resource Type:
Article/report

Date of Publication:
November 2008

Associated Sectors:

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